The Four Best Things You Can do to Cut Energy Use in your Home
Jan 06, 2017
Written by Ashley Leach

With electricity powering most electronic devices that we use daily we now consume more energy from fossil fuels than ever before. We use electricity to power machines that appear in every aspect of our lives, including:

  • Communication and technology (cell phones, tablets, computers, routers, printers)
  • Entertainment (televisions, cable boxes, gaming systems, sound systems)
  • Personal hygiene (trimmers, clippers, razors, hair dryers, curling irons)
  • Temperature control (heating, cooling, dehumidifying)
  • Food storage and prep (refrigerators, freezers, ovens, microwaves, stove tops)
  • Appliances large and small (washer, dryer, mixer, blender, coffeemaker)

With the constant drain of power, energy bills can climb steadily and so can the carbon footprint of each person in a home. How can you reduce energy use and still live comfortably?

Shut Off Standby Devices

By Disconnecting communication and technology devices from charging sources when they’re not in use can save you up to 5% on your electricity bill over the course of a year. If your electric bill is generally $200 a month, the savings would be $240 a year – enough for a small luxury purchase of some kind, such as - tickets for an amusement park, or a night out on the town.  

Slightly Change your Cleaning Processes

Fill your dishwasher completely before running it, and opt for a slightly cooler water temperature and an air dry end to the cycle. Wash clothes in cold water when possible (using a liquid detergent rather than a powder), and utilize the temperature sensor on your dryer to reduce drying times instead of setting it for 60+ minutes each time. You should also lower the temperature on your water heater by 10 degrees.

Switch your Light Bulbs

By switching out just 15 incandescent light bulbs in your home for compact fluorescent bulbs, you can get the same amount of light while using less energy. You could save up to $50 a year in energy costs with this simple trick.2

Swap out your HVAC Filters

Your filters in your cooling/air conditioning units should be changed once per month, year ‘round. When filters become clogged with dust and dirt, the compressor has to work harder to force the air flow – resulting in higher electricity bills. Energy consumption by HVAC systems account a large portion of a home’s energy use, so even a 5% drop in this area can help.

By following these tips, you can achieve a significant drop both in energy use and in carbon dioxide emissions, lowering your energy bills and helping to reduce your footprint at the same time.

 

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Ashley Leach

Ashley Leach is a freelance writer and digital content marketer with a background in journalism, digital reporting, and marketing for numerous industries. She's found her perfect fit at North American Power in writing about home maintenance and repairs, energy efficiency, and smart home technology.